Google
Web Site



Foliage variation vs. Color - can be just as interesting

Who wants a boring yard? No one! However, it takes someone with expertise or a keen eye to make great plant choices that will make the most of your garden. And sometimes using a wide variety of foliage variations isn't the answer. You might be able to do just as much with color. Color draws the eye and brings attention to the areas of your yard you most want to highlight. Here are some suggestions; make the selections based on your personal preference and the shrubs and flowers that will compliment one another. We start with the Burning Bush Fire Ball; it looks just as it sounds a burst of bright red during the fall. This shrub is durable and will survive the coldest of winters. It will grow in many soil types, but does need adequate water. Outside of fall, the bright green leaves will also be attractive and compliment another plant that turns color in different season. That plant might be the Daylily. Daylilies come in a variety of colors, choose your favorite. These flowers are dependable perennials that will last several years. They bloom from late spring until autumn and can be planted in most soils and will tolerate a dry or moist climate. They grow best with direct sun, but will do fairly well in the shade as well. Another suggestion: the Red Bud Forest Pansy, which will give your yard color from spring through fall. This tree's leaves will turn deep shades of red, maroon and purple, then in fall turn to shades of yellow and orange. Now you must have some room; it will reach a height of about 20 feet with a spread of fifteen. It prefers sunlight, but can flourish with some sun and shade. If you prefer cool colors, try some pale Nikko blue Hydrangeas; they are stunning. All hydrangeas will bloom and grow well in morning sun and afternoon shade. Another hydrangea with beautiful coloring is the Shamrock. It is more delicate than other hydrangeas. It blooms in July with pink and blue and will deepen into a red or violet as the season goes. One final idea is the Butterfly Bush Peacock. The plants are 3 to 4 feet and bushy, but are loaded with colorful pink flowers. They prefer full sun and do well in a wide variety of moistures. Your choices really are endless, but hopefully this will get you started on a path of discovering colorful plants that will accentuate your garden.
z

 
Copyright © 1999-2015 Gardendesigner.com
All Rights Reserved